Exercise Ball Exercises for Cellulite

Cellulite is a non-life-threatening substance that builds up under the skin and makes it look rough and dimpled. Although cellulite is nearly impossible to get rid of altogether, you can take proactive measures to make it less noticeable. According to the Mayo Clinic, strengthening muscles in your legs, thighs and buttocks can improve the appearance of the dimpled skin. You can do these exercises with the aid of an exercise ball.

Wall Squats

Wall squats are done with the exercise ball pinched against a wall at the middle of your back. Step your feet forward, place them shoulder-width apart, and lower yourself by bending your knees. After holding briefly, stand back up and repeat. Wall squats work your butt and thighs, and you can increase the resistance by holding dumbbells at your sides.

Lunges

Lunges are intense leg exercises that work your butt, hamstrings and quads. Place the top of one foot on the ball, and step your other foot forward so you are in a staggered stance. Lower yourself by bending your front knee, then lift back up. You can hold dumbbells for added resistance. If you feel unsteady when doing lunges, grab a weight bench for balance.

Butt Raises

Butt raises are done from a face-up position on the floor. Place your feet on top of the ball, then lift your hips into in the air while forcefully squeezing your butt muscles (glutes. Lower yourself and repeat. This exercise also targets your hamstrings.

Adductor Squeeze

An adductor squeeze is an isometric exercise–there is no lengthening or shortening of a muscle. “Adduction” means to bring toward the body. Sit in a chair, place the ball between your knees, and squeeze it forcefully. This mainly works the insides of your thighs.

About this Author

Kevin Rail has worked in the fitness industry since 2001 and has been writing since 2004. He has professional experience as a certified personal trainer, wellness coach, motivational engineer and freelance fitness writer. He currently writes a monthly column for Ron Jones High-Performance Health. Rail has a bachelor’s degree in sports management: fitness and wellness from California University of Pennsylvania.