Sugar in the Raw Nutrition Information

Overview

Sugar in the Raw is a unique sweetener with a distinctive look and flavor, often found in brown sugar packets at restaurants. Sugar in the Raw is actually a brand of raw, natural cane turbinado sugar. It has large, coarse brown granules that have been steam cleaned and have a hint of molasses in the flavor. It is nutritionally comparable to other types of sugar but with a different look and taste.

Calories

Each 5 gram individual serving size packet of Sugar in the Raw has 20 calories. Each teaspoon of Sugar in the Raw has 15 calories. These amounts are just slightly less than regular white sugar because Sugar in the Raw is moister and has a slightly higher water content than refined white sugar.

Sugar

There are 5 grams of sugar in each 5 gram packet of Sugar in the Raw. There are also 4 grams of sugar in each teaspoon. This type of brown turbinado sugar spikes the body’s blood sugar levels at about the same speed as regular white sugar.

Carbohydrates

There are 5 grams of carbohydrates in each 5 gram packet of Sugar in the Raw, so each gram of sugar correlates directly to 1 gram of carbohydrate. This means there are no other ingredients added, such as proteins or fats, and sugar is the only ingredient. There are also 4 grams of carbohydrates in each teaspoon of Sugar in the Raw.

Protein

Since sugar does not naturally contain any protein, there are zero grams of protein in Sugar in the Raw, regardless of what serving size it is. No protein or other ingredient has been added to Sugar in the Raw. Sometimes there is protein in the food which Sugar in the Raw is added to, such as a coffee and milk drink, however.

Fat

There is no fat in any type of sugar, including Sugar in the Raw. Sugar in the Raw is considered a fat free food; however, this does not mean that its quantities do not need to be limited for those on a low-fat diet, especially since calories (which is Sugar in the Raw does have) are usually taken into account on these types of diets. Sugar does affect the body in different ways and excess amounts are not good for the heart, even though it is fat-free.

About this Author

Sarah Davis has worked in nutrition in the clinical setting and currently works as a licensed Realtor in California. Davis began writing about nutrition in 2006 and had two chapters published in “The Grocery Store Diet” book in 2009. She enjoys writing about nutrition and real estate and managing her website, RealtorSD.com. She earned her bachelor’s degree in nutrition from San Diego State University.