5 Things You Need to Know About Lacrosse Techniques

1. The Slow Whistle Technique

Here’s a mouthful from the International Lacrosse Federation: If a defending player commits a foul, and the attacking team has possession of the ball at the time that the foul occurs, and, in the opinion of the referees, a scoring play is imminent, and the act of fouling does not cause the attacking player who is in possession to lose the ball, then the referee must drop a signal flag and with-hold his whistle until such time as the scoring play has been completed.

2. When the Scoring Play is Considered

The scoring play is completed when: The attacking team has lost control of the ball; the attacking team has clearly lost the opportunity of scoring a goal; or the attacking team has taken a shot. When the flag is dropped and the ball is in front of the defending team’s goal, the attacking team, having caused the ball to go behind the goal, and having then brought it to the front of the goal, cause it to go behind their opponent’s goal again, the scoring play is completed. When flag is dropped and the ball is behind the defending team’s goal, the attacking team, having brought the ball to the front of the goal, cause it to go behind the goal again, the scoring play is completed.

3. The Slow Whistle Technique

A pass is a movement of the ball caused by a player in control throwing or bouncing or rolling the ball to a teammate. During a slow whistle situation, a shot remains a shot until it is clearly obvious that a goal will not be scored; possession is gained by a member of the defending team; or after hitting the goalkeeper, the ball touches any player of either team other than the defending goalkeeper. The ball will be declared dead immediately.

4. When a Flag is Thrown Mistakenly

In this case, when the whistle subsequently blows to stop the play, the ball will be awarded o the team that has possession. If neither team has possession, then there will be a face-off.

5. The Play-On Technique

Where a player commits a loose-ball technical foul, and the offended team may be disadvantaged by the immediate suspension of play, then the referee will visually and verbally signal, “Play-on.” He will withhold his whistle until such time as the situation involving the potential advantage has been completed. If the offended team gains possession of the ball, then the play-on situation has lapsed, and the official will cease to signal. If the offending team gains possession of the ball, then the whistle sounds, then the offended team is awarded the ball. If the offended team commits a foul, then the whistle blows and the usual simultaneous foul rules apply.

About this Author

Jerry Shaw has written on health and fitness for Today in PT magazine, Your Health magazine, and newspapers published by Gannett and American Media Inc. He is author of a book on estate management to be published this year. He lives in Florida.